October 30, 2014
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Hurricane Sandy takes it easy on residents of Western New York

BY: Jeff Martin | November 02, 2012

SPRINGVILLE — The anticipated fallout from Hurricane Sandy, earlier this week, left some Springville residents scratching their heads.

Arnold Smith took a walk with his dog Deke along Spring Brook Creek off Main Street on Tuesday morning, Oct. 30. Like many Western New York residents, he had taken the day off from work because forecasters called for heavy rain and high winds.

“It was a bust, around here, anyway,” Smith said.

Springville Superintendent of Public Works Karl Lux said his crews were expecting a storm that never came. On Tuesday morning, one tree limb was reported down, disrupting electric service for a small number of customers.

“We were prepared,” Lux said. “The storm was supposed to turn north and come up into our area, but it just continued west. It saved us a lot of aggravation, though.”

Local creeks, specifically Spring Brook and the smaller tributaries that empty into Cattaraugus Creek, were not as high as Lux said he had expected them to be.

He added that the summer drought probably had something to do with that, since the last week’s steady rain brought levels up to normal.

Crews worked to clear problem streets and areas of leaves, to help with drainage. They also disposed of some smaller tree limbs that were scattered on streets.

By Tuesday afternoon, the rainy weather conditions that had remained in the area for days had dissipated.

The Springville-Griffith Institute School District had canceled classes the night before, and some businesses, like the public library, also closed. Smith said that the lack of activity on Main Street surprised him, adding that he has seen more traffic activity in three feet of snow.

New York City and several coastal cities did not fare so well, last week.

Thousands of miles of coastline were flooded and millions of people lost power Monday night and early Tuesday morning. The death toll reached 38 by Tuesday morning, vehicles were submerged and subway lines in New York City were closed.

“We were spared,” Lux said, adding that Western New York residents and the communities they live in are always prepared for weather-related emergencies.

“The way we’re set up, the way we do things here, we’re well prepared,” he said.

The forecast for Sunday, Nov. 5 called for partly sunny skies with a chance of showers and Monday’s temperature is expected to be in the mid-50s.

Those mild temperatures are expected to last through the winter, according to local weather forecasters.

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